Salt Restrictions

Yesterday I received an action alert from the Weston A. Price Foundation. Here is an excerpt from the action alert:

” The FDA is laying the groundwork for extensive restrictions on salt. This threatens your health and your access to foods traditionally prepared with salt, such as cheese and fermented vegetables.
The agency is seeking public comments on a document entitled “Approaches to Reducing Sodium Consumption.” This title indicates that they have already decided that sodium consumption should be reduced and all that’s left are the regulations as to how.
We need your help to fight back! The FDA needs to hear that Americans disagree with the government becoming involved in regulating salt consumption.”

This reminds me of a part in the fictional book Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank. The book written in 1959 deals with the aftermath of nuclear war. The people in the book have run out of salt; “As soon as they were out of salt it seemed that almost everything required salt, most of all the human body. Day after day the porch thermometer stood at ninety-five or over and every day all of them had manual labor to do, and miles to walk. They sweated rivers. They sweated their salt away, and they grew weak, and they grew ill. And all of Fort Repose grew weak and ill for there was no salt anywhere.”

While the excerpt from Alas, Babylon is a fictional account, the article Salt of the Earth from the Wise Traditions in Food, Farming and the Healing Arts Summer 2011 is a well researched fact based article proving that salt is essential for a healthy and functioning body. “Salt is an essential nutrient. This is a technical descriptor, not marketing hype. An essential nutrient is one required for life that the body cannot produce itself and which is required for good health. For humans, salt is as essential as water. We can perish from too little salt as we can of thirst. The human body contains about eight ounces of salt. The amount of salt is regulated in our bodies by our kidneys and by perspiration. “ Be sure to read the entire article Salt of the Earth here.

Now I understand that the FDA isn’t wanting to eliminate salt just restrict it. But if they start there, where will it end? At what consequences to our health?

What can you do?

Visit this link for the entire action alert and follow the instructions to leave a comment regarding this proposed regulation. Comment deadline is January 27, 2012.

Edited to Add: Here is a 2 minute video from the salt guru with his thoughts on this.

“If people let the government decide what foods they eat and what medicines they take, their bodies will soon be in as sorry a state as the souls who live under tyranny. “
Thomas Jefferson
Photo Credit: justmakeit on Flickr
Millie

Comments

  1. Erin

    >I wholly share your concerns when it comes to the government interfering with food – I'm a huge advocate of food sovereignty! I think this restriction is likely due to the amount of salt the average American eats from commercially-produced foods and fast foods. The levels of sodium in a standard fast-food-type meal are absolutely staggering.

    Not enough salt is a greater concern than too much salt, to be sure, but excessive salt over a long period of time contributes to a host of problems.

    Still, I'd rather see regulations as to what vendors can put into our food than restrictions on individuals! It's alarming what passes for "food" in this country – antifreeze/solvent components (propylene glycol,) byproducts of paper production (vanillin) – it's appalling!

    Thanks for the alert on the forthcoming salt regulations. 🙂

  2. Tiff :o)

    >I hate how they try to tell us what we can/can't eat. There was a Agriculture Commissioner that was running for office and he was saying that he would legalize raw milk and all this other stuff. I talked him up to everyone I knew but he didn't win. :o( If people don't want raw milk, they don't have to drink it, let them have pasturized. If the government doesn't think we should eat so much salt, then they should add it to their wonky food pyramid. Advise people, don't tell them how they have to live.

  3. Millie

    >Erin,
    I totally agree that the sodium levels in convenience foods/fast foods is horrible.

    Here's my concern, where will it stop? What is to keep them from saying that the sea salt I use must then be cut with something else so it isn't as strong? And what might that something else be? Or (as the action alert pointed out) foods that rely on salt such as my favorite Bubbies pickles or yummy cheeses, what about those? And I know lots of people love bacon. Would that have to be salt free?

    And of course this comes from the FDA who says that we have no fundamental right to consume the foods we see fit (I'm paraphrasing but here are the actual quotes http://farmtoconsumer.org/litigation-FDA-status.htm) Sigh.

    Tiff,
    Right. While I don't agree with the pyramid, education should be the avenue. "We Teach, We Teach, We Teach." (Weston A. Price, DDS)
    Did you know wonky food pyramid is now replaced by a plate. Take a look at choosemyplate.gov

  4. Pingback: 5 Warning Signs you Might be Living in Denial « Real Food for Less Money « Moringa Ninja

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